Chapel Cap refers to a Circle or triangle lace which was formerly placed on the head when entering a Catholic Church for services. It was carried in purse.

Chapel Cap is called Be lo in Filipino, which was used in earlier times when entering a church. It is generally made of lace. The Traditional one is triangular in shape, while the modern ones are round.

Author's Note: When I was growing up, as far back as I can remember, around mid 60's, we were not allowed to enter the church without using or wearing a Belo. I lost tract already when we already started to go to church without a Belo, but still some older people especially in the rural areas still use Belo when entering a church.

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